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Spyros Artavanis-Tsakonas

Spyros Artavanis-Tsakonas
Professor Emeritus of Cell Biology
Professeur au Collège de France

Using molecular and genetic approaches, we are examining how various signals are integrated in undifferentiated cells in order to dictate cell fates and ultimately influence morphogenesis. Our main experimental system is Drosophila, but we are interested in exploiting this system as a tool to explore human biology and understand the underlying mechanisms of pathologies such as cancer.

John Blenis

J. Blenis
Professor of Cell Biology

The Blenis lab concentrates on several signaling mechanisms inside a single cell, hoping to decipher the cell's complex internal code.

Joan Brugge

J. Brugge
Chair
Professor of Cell Biology
Director of the Ludwig Center at Harvard

Our laboratory is investigating the cellular processes and pathways that are involved in normal morphogenesis of epithelial tissues as well as those involved in the initiation and progression of epithelial tumors.

Nika Danial

Nika Danial
Associate Professor of Cell Biology

The primary focus of our laboratory is to delineate cellular energy and nutrient sensing pathways, including metabolic checkpoints that integrate cellular survival and bioenergetics.

Gaudenz Danuser

G. Danuser
Professor of Cell Biology

Our lab develops quantitative live cell imaging methods and computational models to unravel how cheminal and mechanical signals integrate in the regulation of the cytoskeleton.

Daniel Finley

D. Finley
Professor of Cell Biology

We are interested in the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and related regulatory systems. Specific topics include the mechanism of the proteasome, ubiquitin-like proteins, antizyme, and nonproteolytic functions of ubiquitination.

John Flanagan

John Flanagan
Professor of Cell Biology

We study how cell-cell signaling molecules set up spatial pattern, particularly in the development and regeneration of connections in the nervous system.

Marcia Haigis

Associate Professor of Cell Biology

The Haigis laboratory focuses on the molecular regulation of mitochondrial functions during aging and age-related disease. Our goal is to investigate how pathways that control aging, such as sirtuins, impact mitochondrial fuel utilization, bioenergetics and signaling. To achieve these objectives, we take a multidisciplinary approach that employs biochemical, cellular, and mouse modeling experiments to systematically dissect the mitochondrial pathways of interest.

Wade Harper

Wade Harper
Professor of Cell Biology
B and N Vallee Professor of Molecular Pathology

Our laboratory studies the functions and mechanisms of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in cell cycle and checkpoint control using proteomic, genetic and biochemical approaches.

Tomas Kirchhausen

Tomas Kirchhausen
Professor of Cell Biology
Senior Investigator, PCMM, Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine at Boston Children's Hospital

Our research focuses on the processes that mediate and regulate the movement of membrane proteins throughout cells.

Maofu Liao

Maofu Liao
Assistant Professor of Cell Biology

We use high-resolution electron microscopy to study the structure and function of membrane proteins and other macromolecular complexes.

Stephen Liberles

Associate Professor of Cell Biology
Member: Harvard Program in Neuroscience

We study the molecules, genes, and neural circuits that control instinctive animal behavior. We identified a novel family of sensory receptors in the nose, and are currently exploring their physiological roles. We are also developing new strategies to chart the hypothalamic neural circuitry that governs feeding behavior.

David Pellman

David Pellman
Professor of Cell Biology
Margaret M. Dyson Professor of Pediatric Oncology
HHMI Investigator

Our laboratory works on cell biology topics in two areas: cytoskeletal dynamics and the control of genome stability. Our approaches include genetics, functional genomics, biochemistry and live cell imaging. Ongoing projects use both yeast and animal cell systems.

Pere Puigserver

Pere Puigserver
Professor of Cell Biology

Our laboratory is interested in nutrient sensing in mammalian cells and how it connects to the transcriptional machinery to control gene metabolic regulatory networks.

Tom Rapoport

Tom Rapoport
Professor of Cell Biology
HHMI Investigator

We are interested in the molecular mechanisms by which proteins are transported across or are inserted into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. We have dissected both cotranslational protein translocation in mammals and posttranslational translocation in yeast using a combination of biochemical approaches.

Samara Reck-Peterson

Samara Reck-Peterson
Associate Professor of Cell Biology

We are interested in understanding the mechanisms underlying intracellular transport and cell division, in particular the roles played by microtubules and microtubule-based molecular motors.

Robin Reed

Robin Reed
Professor of Cell Biology

Our broad goal is to understand the function of human RNA machines, such as the SMN complex, the spliceosome and the TREX complex, in both normal and disease states with current emphasis on Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and cancer.

Adrian Salic

Adrian Salic
Associate Professor of Cell Biology

We study biochemical and cellular mechanisms involved in signal transduction through the Hedgehog signaling pathway. We also develop and apply new chemical technologies to study the cell biology of lipids.

Yang Shi

Yang Shi
Professor of Cell Biology
Merton Bernfield Professor of Neonatology, Children's Hospital

A major focus of my lab is to understand epigenetic regulation and its role in human diseases. Specifically, we are investigating how histone methylation is dynamically regulated as well as mechanisms involved in the recognition of combinatorial modifications occurring on histone tails that are important for chromatin regulation.

Bruce Spiegelman

Bruce Spiegelman
Professor of Cell Biology

Our laboratory is centered on the molecular basis of cell differentiation and tissue development, using adipogenesis as a model system. We are also interested in the biochemical mechanisms of metabolic diseases relating to adipogenesis, especially obesity and insulin-resistant diabetes (NIDDM). In addition, we have a major interest in trying to alter cancer cell growth by stimulating pathways of terminal differentiation.

David Van Vactor

David Van Vactor
Professor of Cell Biology

My research interests are focused on the molecular mechanisms that guide neuronal growth cones through the developing embryo to reach and select their appropriate synaptic targets.

Thomas Walz

Thomas Walz
Professor of Cell Biology

Our group uses molecular electron microscopy to determine the structures of integral membrane proteins and macromolecular complexes. We are particularly interested in structural aspects of water, urea and iron transport, protein-lipid interactions and chromatin remodeling.

Jennifer Waters

Jennifer Waters
Director of Microscopy

I am the Director of a core light microscopy facility shared by Cell Biology, Systems Biology & BCMP called the Nikon Imaging Center at Harvard Medical School. The purpose of the facility and the NIC staff is to provide light microscopy expertise and training to the Harvard Medical School community.

Malcolm Whitman

Malcolm Whitman
Professor of Cell Biology

The Whitman lab is interested in how signals are transduced into highly specific biological responses during embryogenesis, during physiological responses of an organism to stress or damage,  and  during the development of various disease pathologies.

Junying Yuan

Junying Yuan
Professor of Cell Biology

The research in Yuan lab is aimed at elucidation of the molecular mechanisms regulating cell death under physiological and pathological conditions.