• The Cell Biology Research Scholars Program is a Harvard University summer internship for undergraduate students with a passion for scientific discovery and fundamental biology.
    Read more and apply ...

  • Cell Biology department at the annual retreat, Cape Cod, Massachusetts - October 12, 2016

  • Images courtesy of Talley Lambert, PhD (Cell Biology Microscopy Facility)

  • Dr. Craig B. Thompson (MSKCC), 2016 Fawcett Lecture Series

Recent Awards & Achievements

News - 10/13/2016 - 12:07pm

Steve Liberles named an HHMI Faculty Scholar and also receives NIH Director's Pioneer Award
Steve Liberles

Congratulations to Steve Liberles!  He recently was named an HHMI Faculty Scholar as an early career scientist with great potential.  These scholar awards are funded by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), the Simons Foundation, and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.  For more information, see ...Read more >>

Latest Research

News - 12/01/2016 - 9:45am

Shi Lab finds that the PRC2 associated protein EPOP/C17orf96 pays a dual role in gene regulation and may contribute to cancer
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Gene regulatory networks are pivotal for many biological processes. In mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), the transcriptional network can be divided into three functionally distinct modules: Polycomb, Core, and Myc. The Polycomb module represses developmental genes, while the Myc module is associated with proliferative functions, and its mis-regulation is linked to cancer development. New work from the ...Read more >>

News - 10/18/2016 - 9:57am

Puigserver Lab Finds that Bromodomain Inhibition Rescues Bioenergetic Failures Caused by Mitochondrial Complex I Mutations
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Mutations in mitochondrial proteins (either nuclear or mitochondrial-encoded) cause bioenergetic failures observed in mitochondrial diseases. Rescue of these bioenergetic defects constitutes a feasible strategy to prevent cellular deterioration that leads to cell death. New work from the Puigserver lab, published in Molecular Cell (see also ...Read more >>

News - 09/28/2016 - 12:30pm

Rapoport Lab demonstrates how ER shaping proteins cooperate to generate and maintain a tubular ER network
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How the shape of an organelle is generated is only poorly understood, but is a fundamental question in cell biology. An interesting example is the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as it consists of morphologically distinct domains. The ER comprises the nuclear envelope and the peripheral ER that consists of tubules connected by three-way junctions into a network, as well as interdispersed sheets. During mitosis, the tubular ER network converts into sheets. Two protein families, the reticulons ( ...Read more >>